Local heroes explain how we can all make a difference in the fight against climate change

People frustrated by political inaction on climate change are taking matters into their own hands.

While some people dismiss individual small steps as too small for real change, a growing number of green heroes are taking singular actions and innovative programs can galvanize greater change.

Individuals and community groups share their ideas for saving the environment and try to use the power of the people to form a strong and unified voice that politicians cannot ignore.

“We have seen a growing awareness of climate change and environmental issues over the past two years and I think people have become frustrated with the amount of waste in their daily lives. »Fiona Dear, campaign manager for The Climate Coalition Recount I.

“A lot of people want to see the government action and see it
as a government responsibility – but people realize that they have to
doing something themselves too as it’s too frustrating to sit and wait.

Thousands of individuals and communities are taking action across the country to fight climate change and protect green spaces and encourage others to get involved to protect the future of the planet.

Ongoing activities and programs across the UK include everything from Islamic relief and the Muslim Council of Great Britain encourage sermons on the climate in mosques, Christian help organizing a pan-London climate festival for black churches, litter pickups, beach cleanups, green market trails and the random act of greenery.

Fiona Dear, Campaign Manager for The Climate Coalition (Photo: Fiona Dear)

Ms. Dear said, “There are so many people acting individually or as a community and it all adds up to a big change.

“It’s kind of like a vote – some people think ‘What’s the point?’ But that’s what changes the policy. Politicians will listen more if they see individuals and communities taking visible action on climate change.

Waste collectors: “Our goal is to collect 100,000 waste”

Amy and Ella Meek,
18 and 16. Nottingham

Sisters Amy and Ella Meek are the founders of Kids Against Plastic. They set a goal of collecting 100,000 litter because that’s the number of marine mammals that are killed in the sea by plastic each year (Photo: Amy Meek / Kids Against Plastic)

When sisters Amy and Ella Meek go out for a walk and spot trash, they feel compelled to pick it up.

Adolescents are the founders of Children against plastic, an association which fights against plastic pollution. They were inspired to launch the initiative in February 2016 at the age of just 12 and 10 after discovering the negative effect of single-use plastic.

What started as a small school project while learning about the UN’s global goals has turned into Kids Against Plastic – and one of the first goals they set for themselves was garbage collection.

“We have set ourselves the goal of collecting 100,000 litter because that is the number of marine mammals that are killed in the sea by plastic each year.

Sisters Amy and Ella Meek are the founders of Kids Against Plastic. They set a goal of collecting 100,000 litter because that’s the number of marine mammals that are killed in the sea by plastic each year (Photo: Amy Meek / Kids Against Plastic)

“We are currently out of 96,000 and hope to reach 100,000 pieces very soon. Once you start to notice some trash, it becomes difficult to miss it.

“Sustainability always seems to be an important and intimidating thing. But it is for everyone to do their part and adapt it to their lifestyle.

The clothing cross: “Clothing swaps are good for the planet and the wallet”

Zaqiya Cajee, 18 years old. London

Zaqiya Cajee, 18, created SwopItUp in schools to fight climate change and fight fast fashion. It works on a token basis, students bring unwanted clothes to school and exchange them for different clothes (Photo: Zaqiya Cajee / Aasma Day)

A plan to encourage schoolchildren to swap clothes instead of buying them was first devised by Zaqiya Cajee during a family vacation in Italy.

It was the summer of 2018, and she was horrified when report by the world’s leading climatologists warned that there were only 12 years left to bring global warming under control before significant and irreversible damage.

“It made me change my mind. I realized that I had to make change, rather than wait for it, ”said Ms. Cajee, 18.

While in Italy, Ms. Cajee visited second-hand clothing markets and rebuilt her wardrobe for less than € 30. This led to the idea of ​​creating SwopItUp in schools to fight against fast fashion.

Zaqiya Cajee, 18, created SwopItUp in schools to fight climate change and fight fast fashion. It works on a token basis, with students bringing unwanted clothes to school and exchanging them for different clothes. Zaqiy Cajee came up with the idea for SwopItUp and started it at his Burntwood School in Wandsworth. The 18-year-old is now planning a gap year to introduce the program to as many schools as possible (Photo: Zaqiya Cajee / Aasma Day)

She said: “Clothing swaps are good for the planet and the wallet. Using what we already have is the most sustainable thing.

Ms Cajee is planning a gap year so that she can pursue her vision of integrating SwopItUp into all UK schools. The program works by giving students tokens for clothes which are exchanged for alternative clothes.

The activist: “The climate crisis is a betrayal of young people”

Pippa Stilwell, 74, Cornwall

Pippa Stilwell, 74, is a Climate Ambassador for the Women’s Institute and believes in individual and collective action. Here she plants climbing beans in her garden (Photo: Pippa Stilwell / Aasma Day)

The Women’s Institute has a reputation for being an effective campaign organization, so it is well positioned to raise the profile of climate change, says Pippa Stilwell.

The 74-year-old man, from Penzance, who has been involved with the WI for 15 years and is a Climate Ambassador WI, helped organize a climate march through Truro with elementary school students, parents and teachers.

The mother of four and the grandmother of nine believe it is important for individuals to act and pressure the government to change. “I think it’s an outright betrayal of young people that climate change has been able to drift for so long,” she said. “I think the government is very complacent.”

Ms Stilwell and her husband quit flying about 20 years ago, have solar panels in their home, and grow lots of their own vegetables.

While living in Worcestershire, they planted 500 trees and planted 50 more since moving to Cornwall. She rarely buys new clothes, rework and repairs, as well as knitting, weaving and needlework.

“Individual action is important, but there is not a lot that individuals can do,” she added. “WI can inspire people to make a bigger difference. “

Source link

About Robert Davis

Check Also

Italy targets unvaccinated with restrictions as cases rise | Government-and-politics

“We started to return to normality. We want to keep this normal, ”Draghi said at …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *